Re-Opening Committee

The Horizons Reopening Committee met again this Tuesday and notes are attached here.

Notes

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Did You Know?

Dorothy Height

Height has been called the matriarch of the civil rights movement and often worked outside of the public eye. After receiving two degrees from New York University in the 1930s, Height worked for the New York City Welfare Department and then became the assistant executive director of the Harlem Y.M.C.A. She was involved in anti-lynching protests, brought public attention to the exploitation of African-American women working in “slave markets,” and escorted First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt to the National Council of Negro Women, a council she served on for more than 40 years. In the 1950s, she lobbied President Dwight D. Eisenhower to take an aggressive stance on school desegregation issues. Height also worked with Martin Luther King Jr. and she stood on the platform with as he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech in August 1963.

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Return Dates 2021-22 School Year

AUGUST
Tues, Aug 17 5-8 students return
Wed, Aug 18 K-4 students return
Mon & Tues, Aug 23 & 24 K-2 Assessments – NO CLASSES for K-2

Please note that next year’s daily schedule has yet to be determined.

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Horizons Council Agenda

Horizons Council Agenda

Thursday, 2/18/21 600-800 

Minutes: TBD
Facilitators, Lucas Ketzer & Tyler Currie

6:00 Welcome/Intro/Council Agreements

6:10  Announcements

6:20 Teacher Share-Out

6:30 Council Budget Approval

6:45 Committee Reports
DAC – Karla, DPC – Kat or Caron, Diversity – Erica, Community Group – Callie, FRC, Board Report

7:00 Open Forum (Members are allowed up to 3 minutes of sharing without comment)

7:15 Close

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85889873841?pwd=dEVjVXpRdGN6bG41bzBHa1VDUksxQT09

Meeting ID: 858 8987 3841
Passcode: 310718

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How to leave a message

If you wish to leave a message at the school…..

Dial 720 561 3600.  You will hear a canned voice.  When you hear it, push the # key.  At that point, you will hear our outgoing message.  After that you can leave your message.  Thank you.

 

 

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ITS TONIGHT!!!

Mark Your Calendars – Feb 16 Community Discussion on Race, Social Justice and  Identity
Is Horizons a welcoming place for all students and families- regardless of race, ethnicity, gender identity, and socio-economic status? What type of students does Horizons serve best? How would you describe the type of family that sends their student to Horizons? What is our reputation in the community? Please join our facilitated conversation with Vernon Jones, a leading social justice advocate, as we address social justice and our identity as a school. We need your participation in this critical work as we strive to make Horizons supportive and inclusive for all families and cultivate young people prepared to fight for justice. 6pm-7:30pm.  Here is the link
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Did You Know?

Madam C.J. Walker?

Madam C.J. Walker invented a line of African American hair products after suffering from a scalp ailment that resulted in her own hair loss. She promoted her products by traveling around the country giving lecture-demonstrations and eventually established Madame C.J. Walker Laboratories to manufacture cosmetics and train sales beauticians.

Her business acumen led her to be one of the first American women to become a self-made millionaire. She was also known for her philanthropic endeavors, including a donation toward the construction of an Indianapolis YMCA in 1913. Walker’s life was portrayed in the 2020 TV show Self Made, with Octavia Spencer portraying Walker.

Early Life

Walker was born Sarah Breedlove on December 23, 1867, on a cotton plantation near Delta, Louisiana. Her parents, Owen and Minerva, were enslaved and recently freed, and Sarah, who was their fifth child, was the first in her family to be free-born.

Minerva died in 1874 and Owen passed away the following year, both due to unknown causes, leaving Sarah an orphan at the age of seven. After her parents’ passing, Sarah was sent to live with her sister, Louvinia, and her brother-in-law.

The three moved to Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1877, where Sarah picked cotton and was likely employed doing household work, although no documentation exists verifying her employment at the time.

Hair Care

During the 1890s, Sarah developed a scalp disorder that caused her to lose much of her hair, and she began to experiment with both home remedies and store-bought hair care treatments in an attempt to improve her condition.

In 1905, she was hired as a commission agent by Annie Turnbo Malone — a successful, Black, hair-care product entrepreneur — and she moved to Denver, Colorado.

READ MORE: How Madam C.J. Walker Invented Her Hair Care Products

Madam C.J. Walker Company

While there, Sarah’s husband, Charles, helped her create advertisements for a hair care treatment for African Americans that she was perfecting. Her husband also encouraged her to use the more recognizable name “Madam C.J. Walker,” by which she was thereafter known.

In 1907 Walker and her husband traveled around the South and Southeast promoting her products and giving lecture demonstrations of her “Walker Method” — involving her own formula for pomade, brushing and the use of heated combs.

Walker Agents

As profits continued to grow, in 1908 Walker opened a factory and a beauty school in Pittsburgh, and by 1910, when Walker transferred her business operations to Indianapolis, the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company had become wildly successful, with profits that were the modern-day equivalent of several million dollars.

In Indianapolis, the company not only manufactured cosmetics but also trained sales beauticians. These “Walker Agents” became well known throughout the Black communities of the United States. In turn, they promoted Walker’s philosophy of “cleanliness and loveliness” as a means of advancing the status of African Americans.

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Race, Social Justice and  Identity

Mark Your Calendars – Feb 16 Community Discussion on Race, Social Justice, and  Identity
Is Horizons a welcoming place for all students and families- regardless of race, ethnicity, gender identity, and socio-economic status?
What type of students does Horizons serve best?
How would you describe the type of family that sends their student to Horizons?
What is our reputation in the community?
Please join our facilitated conversation with Vernon Jones, a leading social justice advocate, as we address social justice and our identity as a school. We need your participation in this critical work as we strive to make Horizons supportive and inclusive for all families and cultivate young people prepared to fight for justice. 6pm-7:30pm.
Here is the link
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Boulder Community Emergency Alert

Boulder Community Emergency Alert

around “fake” Xanax & Opioids containing Fentanyl

In the last few weeks several teens in our community have died from overdoses. While the toxicology reports will take weeks to come back, we know from teens that the overdoses were likely caused by Fentanyl laced “fake” Xanax, Oxycontin & Percocet. Several more teens have overdosed and barely survived. The Boulder community is flooded with Fentanyl laced pills and they are in the hands of teens who are not always aware of the high risks.

We just received an emergency briefing from the CO State that more than 90% of all pills on the black market are fake and contain Fentanyl. In the seized pills, over 25% contain a lethal amount of Fentanyl.

Sometimes teens and adults underestimate the risk of Fentanyl or think they have the risk under control, but:

  • Every pill even in the same batch can contain different concentrations of Fentanyl
  • Even when a pill gets tested by a user with a test kit, another part of the pill might have a different concentration of Fentanyl
  • Fentanyl is such a highly concentrated opiate (50-100 times more potent than heroin) that mixing it with alcohol, benzodiazepines (Xanax) or any other substance even in very small quantities might cause an overdose because of the exponential effects in can create.
  • People with lower tolerance (people who have stayed clean for a while or use periodically) are at higher risk for overdosing.

Please talk to your teens and any adult about this risk and ask them to spread the word.

These are some strategies to help people be safer:

  • Even testing the pills with testing kits might not tell you that they are not safe so this would be a time to not use “fake” pills and help your friends not use “fake” pills
  • Never use alone
  • Call 911 even if someone got revived from an overdose because Fentanyl can cause a delayed overdose after someone was brought back with Narcan
  • Carry Narcan or give people information about Narcan (keep in mind that one dose might not be enough for a Fentanyl induced overdose)
  • Call 911 if you see someone being at risk for overdosing, the Good Samaritan law applies, people will not be charged for making the 911 call to save someone’s life.

We are holding a special FREE Natural Highs Class for TEENS this coming Tuesday, February 16, 4.15pm-5.30pm OUTDOORS at September School, 96 Arapahoe Ave, open to all teens to learn about Fentanyl, the risk for overdose and Narcan. Everyone will receive a FREE Narcan Kit to take home and instructions in how to use it.

You can also get Narcan Kits at several locations in Boulder County: https://www.bouldercounty.org/families/disease/narcan/

Here is a Narcan Training Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGdUFMrCRh4

Please reach out to Avani Dilger if you have questions, concerns, or want to share information: 303-859-5778 (text is best)

https://www.bouldercounty.org/news/street-drugs-in-boulder-county-found-to-contain-fentanyl/

February 6, 2021

Street Drugs in Boulder County Found to Contain Fentanyl

Boulder County, CO – Boulder County, CO – Boulder County Public Health was notified on Thursday, February 4 of street drugs tainted with fentanyl in Boulder County. They are Xanax and Oxycodone 30 mg pills that are currently being circulated in the community, most probably from Mexico.

The pills contain fentanyl and pose an increased risk to the community, especially youth. Fentanyl is 50 – 100 times more potent than heroin, and significantly increases the risk of death from accidental overdose.

Each day in the United States, more than 100 people die as a result of drug overdose. Rates of drug overdose have increased dramatically in the past decade, with drug overdose surpassing motor vehicle accidents as the leading cause of accidental death.

“Anyone who may use street drugs, or knows someone who does, should keep Naloxone (an overdose reversal drug) with them at all times,” said Trina Faatz of the Boulder County Substance Use Advisory Group. “And, if possible, avoid using alone, or inform someone that they will be using.”

Signs of overdose include:

  • Not responsive to sound or pain, such as a sternum rub
  • Not breathing
  • Blue lips or fingertips
  • Loud gurgling sounds

Naloxone, also known as Narcan, can reverse the effects of a drug overdose from opiates, including heroin and prescription opiates, such as Percocet or Oxycontin. Overdose prevention kits are available from Boulder County Public Health as well as some local pharmacies, without a prescription. Visit BoulderCountyNarcan.org for a map of pharmacies that carry it.

Videos of how to use naloxone are available at BoulderCountyWorks.org and on the OpiRescue phone app.

While Naloxone (or Narcan) can reverse the effects of an overdose caused by heroin or other opioids, multiple doses may be needed if the potency of the drug is very strong. Combining other drugs or alcohol with heroin increases the risk of overdose. The risk of overdose is higher when tolerance is low; tolerance decreases after even short periods of not using.

Link about Narcan: https://www.bouldercounty.org/families/disease/the-works-program/

-BoulderCountyHealth.org-

 

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Did you know???

Eunice Hunton Carter

1899-1970

Eunice Hunton Carter

She brought down a fabled Mafia boss

Eunice Hunton Carter was a social worker and prosecutor whose investigative work in New York City in the 1930s led to what was then the largest prosecution of organized crime in US history.

When notorious mob boss Charles “Lucky” Luciano met his downfall, the credit went to the young prosecutor Thomas Dewey, who eventually ran for president.

But it was Carter, an assistant district attorney on his team, who laid the foundation for the case.

Carter was born in Atlanta, the granddaughter of enslaved people. In 1932, she became the first Black woman to graduate from Fordham Law School – at a time when few lawyers were Black or women, let alone Black women.

By then Carter was already married to a dentist and had a son, but she had no interest in being a society mom.

She soon became the first African American woman in New York state to serve as assistant district attorney. As the only woman on Dewey’s team, which had been assembled to fight organized crime, she was relegated to mostly prosecuting crimes against women, such as prostitution.

But while doing so, she discovered that brothels in New York were controlled by Luciano’s mob, which received a share of their earnings in exchange for legal representation. Her painstaking investigative skills built the case against Luciano and led to his conviction in 1936.

Later Carter went into private practice and on to a litany of other accomplishments, including a committee chair at the United Nations.

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